Stop Trendmaker Homes from destroying Houston Wetlands

Our Wetlands

The Armand Potholes area is a unique geologic formation – one of the last prairie pothole complexes left in the Houston area.  Prairie potholes, (concave remnants of ancient river channels) once covered millions of acres on the Texas Gulf Coast.  Only a few thousand acres are left today.   These freshwater depressions, formed thousands of years ago and shaped by wind, by buffalo and other creatures, are irreplaceable geographical legacies – one of the most diverse on earth.  Once they are gone, there is no replacing them. 

Their diverse concentric zones provide fresh water and support a variety of plants and trees – vital habitat to over hundreds of species of resident and migrating birds as well as resident wildlife. 

Why are wetlands so important? 

There are many different kinds of wetlands and they all perform ecological functions, and produce certain goods and services that are valuable to humans. The most important functions wetlands perform on the Texas Gulf Coast are:

Water Quality

Wetlands are one of nature’s most efficient water filters. Wetland plants and soils clean the water before it goes into groundwater or into rivers.  Once destroyed, they cannot be optimally re-created to function equally as well.

Flood buffers

Wetlands reduce severity of floods by acting as natural detention areas. Destruction of many wetlands has made downstream flooding much worse. This particular complex is the last natural detention area in this watershed before storm water runoff gets to Clear Lake and Galveston Bay.

Wildlife Habitat

Our coastal plain wetlands are home to a wide diversity of birds and animals.  80% of all migrating birds in North America (and many also from South America); depend on Texas coastal wetlands for survival during migration.  Our Texas wetlands support abundant wildlife such mammals, amphibians, wading birds (who eat amphibians), thousands of migrating birds, resident birds, and other wildlife.

Irreplaceable Green Space

“The consensus among landscape ecologists is that only 3-5% of the land remains undisturbed for plants and animals” (Rosenzweig 2003). “In other words, humans have taken 95-97% off all land in the lower 48 states for our use” (Tallamy 2007), with “41.4% of land for agriculture, and 53.6-55.6% of land for cities and suburbia” (2002 Census of Agriculture). 

This green space was promised to remain undisturbed by Friendswood Development, an affiliate of ExxonMobil.

Recreation

Bird-watching is economically important. Wildlife watching is the fastest growing segment of the tourism industry.  In 1996, 3.8 million U.S. residents spent $1.2 billion watching wildlife in Texas.    This rare natural area is a valuable asset not only to resident and migrating wildlife but to human residents as well – offering potential aesthetic, educational and recreational opportunities not found in other Clear Lake neighborhoods – an asset we want to preserve and enhance.

Wildlife

The area is home to an abundance of wildlife and will become ‘nuisance’ animals to many residents once their homes are destroyed and/or are killed as a result of the development.

 

For further information as to why Wetlands are so vital to our planet, visit:

www.PineBrookWetlands.com

www.texaswetlands.org

http://water.epa.gov/type/wetlands/vital_status.cfm

http://www.defenders.org/wetlands/basic-facts?gclid=COSCnJHczbgCFeoWMgodlgwAtA

http://wwf.panda.org/about_our_earth/about_freshwater/intro/threats/

https://healthygulf.org/our-work/wetlands/wetland-destruction-permits

 

Donate Now

Sign the Petition

Click here to read, sign and send a letter to our council members! (Opens in a pop up window).

294 signatures

Stop Trendmaker Development in the Clearlake Wetlands

To: Dave Martin, City Council Member - District E
To: Stephen Costello, Council Member at Large 1

We are concerned and strongly object to the proposed residential and retail development of land in the Clear Lake area by Trendmaker Homes and Fidelis at El Dorado and Clear Lake City Blvd. for the following reasons:

• Promises of adjacent undeveloped land in perpetuity: At the time of purchasing their homes, Friendswood Development assured new homeowners that this land would remain undeveloped land in perpetuity.

• There are adjacent homeowner concerns about the safety of existing underground storage tanks and old wells, as well as the difficulty of locating all gathering lines to insure there is no current and future soil and water contamination.

• There may be inadequate detention to support the increased flooding into adjacent neighborhoods when substantial green space and natural wetlands are eliminated.

• Traffic will be significantly increased and jeopardize the safety of children and adults crossing Clear Lake City Boulevard to go from one side of the neighborhood to the other.

• Green space along Clear Lake City Blvd may turn into concrete, with a significant number of 30-50’trees and recently built by City of Houston sidewalk eliminated to build more lanes- increasing traffic noise for adjacent homes and reducing the beauty and value of our neighborhood.

• This area is home to an abundance of wildlife and will become ‘nuisance’ animals to many residents once their homes are destroyed and/or are killed as a result of the development.

• Abundant developed vacant commercial space exists less than 3 miles from the proposed development. Green space is highly preferred verses more parking lots and commercial buildings.

• The development negatively and severely impacts delineated wetlands, home to one of the last prairie pothole complexes in the Houston area.

• Existing wetlands: The Armand Potholes area is a unique geologic formation - one of the last prairie pothole complexes left in the Houston area. Prairie potholes, (concave remnants of ancient river channels) once covered millions of acres on the Texas Gulf Coast. Only a few thousand acres are left today. These freshwater depressions, formed thousands of years ago and shaped by wind, by buffalo and other creatures, are irreplaceable geographical legacies - one of the most diverse on earth. Once they are gone, there is no replacing them. Their diverse concentric zones provide fresh water and support a variety of plants and trees – vital habitat to over hundreds of species of resident and migrating birds as well as resident wildlife. (See www.PineBrookWetlands.com for an example of an adjacent neighborhood prairie pothole).

Sincerely,

[signature]

Share this with your friends:

If your browser settings prohibit pop up windows, click here for another version of the form.

Galveston Baykeepers